By Stephen R. Anderson

ISBN-10: 019927990X

ISBN-13: 9780199279906

ISBN-10: 1435623851

ISBN-13: 9781435623859

The 1st e-book to hide the grammar of clitics from all issues of view, together with their phonology, morphology, and syntax, and the 1st complete survey of clitic phenomena for 20 years. Written with unprecedented readability and according to a direction given to graduate scholars.

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Additional resources for Aspects of the Theory of Clitics (Oxford Studies in Theoretical Linguistics)

Sample text

18) a. Fred is the only werewolf I know. b. Fred’s the only werewolf I know. c. Fred has only been a werewolf since last week. d. Fred’s only been a werewolf since last week. The questions that arise come from the fact that substitution of the reduced form for the full form of the auxiliary is not entirely free. 19). 19) a. Do you know what Freddie is/*’s (this year for Halloween)? b. Tommy has been a werewolf more often than Freddie has/*’s (at Halloween). While not all of the English auxiliary verbs have these reduced forms, quite a number do.

If the very existence of the reduced form follows from the phonology, though, there are no conditions on where it can be inserted. The full form is inserted everywhere, and then the post-lexical phonology does what it likes on the basis of derived structure. Because of this difference, when we evaluate the conditions on cliticization, we have to be clear in each case that we are actually dealing with a clitic form, and not just with a phonetic variant derived by the phonology from a full form. Kaisse’s view of what is going on in the reduced forms was premised on the notion that the syntax is implicated.

Fred is the only werewolf I know. b. Fred’s the only werewolf I know. c. Fred has only been a werewolf since last week. d. Fred’s only been a werewolf since last week. The questions that arise come from the fact that substitution of the reduced form for the full form of the auxiliary is not entirely free. 19). 19) a. Do you know what Freddie is/*’s (this year for Halloween)? b. Tommy has been a werewolf more often than Freddie has/*’s (at Halloween). While not all of the English auxiliary verbs have these reduced forms, quite a number do.

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Aspects of the Theory of Clitics (Oxford Studies in Theoretical Linguistics) by Stephen R. Anderson


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