By Laura Etheredge (editor)

ISBN-10: 1615303081

ISBN-13: 9781615303083

ISBN-10: 1615304010

ISBN-13: 9781615304011

Show description

Read Online or Download Iran (Middle East: Region in Transition) PDF

Best islam books

Andrew J. Newman's Safavid Iran: Rebirth of a Persian Empire PDF

The Safavid dynasty, which reigned from the past due 15th to the eighteenth century, hyperlinks medieval with glossy Iran. The Safavids witnessed wide-ranging advancements in politics, struggle, technological know-how, philosophy, faith, artwork and structure. yet how did this dynasty be able to produce the most lasting and so much wonderful of Iran’s Islamic-period eras?

Eugene Cotran and Martin Lau's Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law, Volume 11 PDF

Practitioners and teachers facing the center East can flip to the "Yearbook of Islamic and center japanese legislations" for an fast resource of knowledge at the advancements over a complete yr within the quarter. The Yearbook covers Islamic and non-Islamic criminal matters, together with the legislation themselves, of a few twenty Arab and different Islamic international locations.

Download e-book for kindle: Islam and Political Violence: Muslim Diaspora and Radicalism by Shahram Akbarzadeh, Fethi Mansouri

How can we have interaction with the urgent demanding situations of xenophobia, radicalism and safeguard within the age of the "war on terror"? the generally felt feel of lack of confidence within the West is shared via Muslims either inside of and out of doors Western societies. becoming Islamic militancy and ensuing elevated safety features through Western powers have contributed to a pervasive feel between Muslims of being below assault (both bodily and culturally).

Extra info for Iran (Middle East: Region in Transition)

Sample text

Guild unions operate locally in most areas but are limited largely to issuing credentials and licenses. The right of workers to strike is generally not respected by the state, and since 1979 strikes have often been met by police action. Roughly one-fourth of Iran’s labour force is engaged in manufacturing and construction. Another one-fifth is engaged in agriculture, and the remainder are divided almost evenly between occupations in services, transportation and communication, and finance. Women are allowed to work outside the home but face restrictions in a number of occupations, and the number of women in the workforce is relatively small in light of their level of education.

Christians are the most numerous group of these, Orthodox Armenians constituting the bulk. The Assyrians are Nestorian, Protestant, and Roman Catholic, as are a few converts from other ethnic groups. The Zoroastrians are largely concentrated in Yazd in central Iran, Kerma¯n in the southeast, and Tehra¯n. Religious toleration, one of the characteristics of Iran during the Pahlavi monarchy, came to an end with the Islamic revolution in 1978–79. While Christians, Jews, and Zoroastrians are recognized in the constitution of 1979 as official minorities, the revolutionary atmosphere in Iran was not conducive to equal treatment of nonMuslims.

Literary Persian, the language’s more refined variant, is understood to some degree by most Iranians. Persian is also the predominant language of literature, journalism, and the sciences. Less than one-tenth of the population speaks Kurdish. The Lurs and Bakhtya¯ rī both speak Lurī, a language distinct from, but closely related to, Persian. Armenian, a single language of the Indo-European family, is spoken only by the Armenian minority. The Altaic family is represented overwhelmingly by the Turkic languages, which are spoken by roughly onefourth of the population; most speak Azerbaijanian, a language similar to modern Turkish.

Download PDF sample

Iran (Middle East: Region in Transition) by Laura Etheredge (editor)


by William
4.5

Rated 4.37 of 5 – based on 42 votes